Improper Working Conditions May Give Rise To Law Suit

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) investigated Amazon (www.amazon.com) this summer and issued multiple recommendations regarding working conditions at their warehouses. The investigation was triggered by dozens of complaints of excessive heat and intolerable working conditions in warehouses operated by the internet giant.

Amazon said they take employee safety very seriously and investigated the complaints. They say they added air conditioning to warehouses where the heat index reportedly reached 114 degrees this summer.

Working conditions and wages are governed by both state and federal laws. These conditions are taken very seriously and even giants like Amazon are not above the law. If you feel you are working in dangerous working conditions, you should talk to a lawyer about your rights. Furthermore, if you were fired from your job for complaining about dangerous work conditions, you should talk to a lawyer about your rights. You may be entitled to compensation for your situation.

If you work for a company like Amazon who claims 2010 revenues of $34 billion, you will likely get a lawyer's attention. In fact, many lawyers will handle a law suit like this on a contingent fee basis. This means that you may not have to put out a dime to sue your employer. The lawyer gets paid out of the settlement money. Also, some workplace law suits entitle the lawyer to fees as a matter of law. These fees are paid above and beyond the damages that are paid to the person who brings the suit.

If you have questions about working conditions or wages at your job, contact me: Attorney Jeffrey Vallens

www.shermanoaksinjurylawfirm.com or email me at: vallenslaw@yahoo.com or call me: (888) 764-4340

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