Curbside Buses Cause More Fatal Accidents

The National Transportation Safety Board says that "curbside" buses are seven times more likely to be involved in fatal accidents as other interstate buses. This is from a recent report authority by the federal safety organization.

The difference between curbside buses and "normal" buses is that curbside buses pick up and drop off their passengers at curbs which are designated as stopping points for the buses. Regualr interstate buses pick up and drop off passengers at terminals which are dedicated to this type of service.

The problem of curbside buses is said to be complicated by the fact that the companies are generally smaller and often changed names in order to avoid inspection by federal authorities whose resources are already strained.

Curbside buses have been a growing trend in recent years. The smaller curbside service companies, often run as subsidiaries of larger bus companies like Greyhound and Coach USA. They are formed to gain a larger market share in providing lower cost transportation to people in need.

Unfortunately, these companies are responsible for a disproportionately large number of bus fatalities. If you wish to check on the safety rating of your curbside bus company, go to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Association's website (www.fmcsa.dot.gov).

And, if you or someone close to you has been injured in a bus accident, call a competent injury attorney right away. If the bus company has been cited for multiple violations like Sky Express, Inc. or Megabus, the case may be even more valuable to the injured party.

For quesitons about bus accidents or any other injury or accident cases,

call me: (888) 764-4340 or

email me at: vallenslaw@yahoo.com

or visit: www.shermanoaksinjurylawfirm.com or www.thousandoaksinjurylawfirm.com

Internet Marketing Experts The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship.